Microbiologist job profile | Prospects.ac.uk (2023)

Microbiologists study microorganisms (microbes) in order to understand how they affect our lives and how we can exploit them

By understanding microbes, microbiologists aim to solve a range of problems affecting our health, the environment, climate and food and agriculture. This can include the prevention, diagnosis and control of infections and disease, as well as ensuring that food is safe, understanding the role that microbes play in climate change, and developing green technologies.

As a microbiologist, you'll focus on the biology of microorganisms at both the molecular and cellular level, as well as their ecology, including viruses, bacteria, archaea, fungi, algae and protozoa. You may work in:

  • hospitals
  • agriculture
  • pharmaceuticals
  • biotechnology
  • education
  • the environment.

Types of microbiologist

Microbiology is a vast subject which overlaps with other areas of life sciences, such as molecular biology, immunology and biochemistry.

Specialist areas include:

  • medicine
  • healthcare
  • research and development
  • agriculture and food safety
  • environment and climate change.

Find out more about what microbiologists do.

Responsibilities

Tasks vary depending on your area of specialism. For example, clinical scientists working in microbiology will be involved in preventing, diagnosing and controlling the spread of infections, whereas those working in manufacturing may be involved in quality control, checking for signs of contamination.

Depending on your area of expertise, you'll typically need to:

  • monitor and identify microorganisms
  • track microorganisms in a range of environments
  • monitor and assess samples from a range of sources
  • follow regular sampling schedules within a specific environment
  • use a variety of identification methods, including molecular techniques, to test samples
  • develop new techniques, products and processes
  • develop and plan methods to prevent the spread of disease
  • develop and register new medicines, vaccines, diagnostic tests and pharmaceutical products
  • plan, implement and evaluate new products in clinical trials
  • collect samples from different types of environments, such as agricultural sites
  • develop products such as enzymes, vitamins, hormones and antimicrobials
  • grow microbial cultures, e.g. for use in the food and drink industry or in agriculture
  • work with specialist computer software to undertake studies and research
  • manage and oversee laboratory work.

You may also need to:

(Video) Top Jobs after M.Sc. Microbiology | M.Sc. Microbiology Jobs

  • plan and organise resources and activities
  • maintain accurate and up-to-date records
  • write up research findings and produce reports
  • keep up with new research
  • attend and present at national and international conferences and other events
  • liaise with colleagues from non-scientific departments
  • supervise support staff
  • tutor, supervise and mentor students (if working as a university lecturer or in a teaching hospital)
  • provide information and advice to colleagues and external bodies.

Salary

  • Jobs in the NHS for microbiologists working as clinical scientists are usually covered by the Agenda for Change (AfC) pay rates, consisting of nine pay bands. Trainee clinical scientists are usually employed at Band 6, on a starting salary of £32,306.
  • Once qualified, you're likely to be employed on Band 7 (£40,057 to £45,839). Salaries for principal and consultant scientists range from £47,126 (Band 8) to £108,075 (Band 9), depending on your experience and training.
  • Salaries for higher education lecturers in microbiology usually follow a nationally agreed pay spine. See the University and College Union (UCU) website for details of the HE pay spine.
  • Research and development work in pharmaceutical firms, public health laboratories and medical research council units tends to attract higher salaries.

Income figures are intended as a guide only.

Working hours

You'll usually work 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, although if you're working as a clinical scientist in the NHS you may be on call.

Larger employers may provide flexible working schemes.

Part-time work is possible.

What to expect

  • The work is generally laboratory-based in pathology departments or diagnostic laboratories in hospitals, although there are opportunities in other types of work environments. You'll usually need to wear protective clothing such as gloves, coat and safety glasses.
  • You'll often work as part of a small team on projects and will usually be responsible for managing your own workload.
  • Contract and temporary work is available at graduate and technician level within a number of sectors.
  • Research work can provide more variety than that of routine identification or monitoring, which may be more structured.
  • You may need to travel during the day for meetings or on-site visits. You may also travel throughout the UK and abroad to attend conferences and take part in collaborative research.

Qualifications

You'll need a good honours degree in a relevant subject to become a microbiologist. Relevant degrees include:

  • microbiology
  • microbial sciences
  • biomedical sciences
  • molecular biology
  • applied biology
  • biological sciences
  • biology (specialising in microbiology).

Courses such as biological sciences or applied biology provide a wide-ranging background prior to having to make choices about specialist areas.

Some employers look for a postgraduate qualification such as a Masters or PhD. To work as a microbiology researcher in a university, you'll need a PhD in a relevant area of microbiology. Integrated postgraduate Masters qualifications such as the MBiol, MBiolSci or MSci may be particularly useful if you want to go onto a PhD.

To work as a clinical scientist in microbiology, you need to successfully complete the NHS Scientist Training Programme (STP). This leads to eligibility to apply for a Certificate of Attainment from the Academy for Healthcare Science, which allows registration as a clinical scientist with the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC). As part of the training, you'll complete an MSc in Clinical Science (Microbiology - Infection Sciences). For full details about applying for the STP, see the National School of Healthcare Science (NSHCS). There are separate scientist training schemes in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Other routes to HCPC registration as a clinical scientist are offered by the:

You can also train as a biomedical scientist.

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If you don't have a degree, it may be possible to enter the profession in a laboratory technician role and gain experience and further qualifications to become a microbiologist. You may also be able to get into a career in microbiology via a higher or degree apprenticeship.

For more information on a career as a microbiologist, see the Microbiology Society.

Skills

You'll need to have:

  • the ability to design and plan research investigations and experiments
  • interpersonal skills, as you may have contact with patients in some roles
  • communication skills, to liaise with colleagues and the wider community
  • the capacity to manage a laboratory project and collaborate with a wide variety of technical colleagues
  • the ability to work well in a team and to manage your own workload
  • problem-solving skills
  • accuracy and a methodical approach to work
  • organisational skills and attention to detail
  • leadership qualities
  • self-motivation and the ability to work with minimal supervision
  • a good level of numeracy and IT skills.

Work experience

Having experience in a laboratory is useful when applying for jobs. If your degree doesn't include a year out in industry or research, consider taking a research project over the summer. Some companies provide funding to support research work in laboratories over the summer. Contact your careers service for information on these opportunities and other internships.

A number of organisations offer funding for students wanting to get hands-on experience during the summer vacation. These include:

Student membership of a professional body such as the Microbiology Society or the SfAM will show your commitment and provide valuable networking and career development opportunities.

Details of pharmaceutical companies you can contact about work experience or work shadowing opportunities are available on The Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) website. Search pharmaceutical recruiters.

You can also contact your local hospital laboratory about work experience or work shadowing opportunities.

Find out more about the different kinds of work experience and internships that are available.

Employers

Microbiologists work in a range of fields. One of the largest is research and analysis, where employers include:

(Video) Microbiologist | 2020 | PR / Immigration requirements for Australia

You can also work in the manufacturing industry for employers such as:

  • pharmaceutical, biochemical, biotechnology and agri-chemical companies
  • food, beverage and bioscience manufacturers
  • food safety organisations, including the Food Standards Agency
  • health, home and personal care product manufacturers.

Jobs can also be found in the environment sector where employers include:

Look for job vacancies at:

Specialist recruitment agencies, such as Jobs in Science and SRG, also advertise vacancies.

Professional development

Training opportunities will depend on your specialist area and on individual employers. In some jobs, salary increases may be available on completion of training. On-the-job training may be related to specific equipment or techniques within your specialist area. Training on new equipment may be delivered by the manufacturers.

Continuing professional development (CPD) is essential for keeping up to date with developing research, and microbiologists are expected to gain further relevant qualifications. CPD activities can include attending events and conferences, mentoring, teaching and having papers published. Professional bodies such as the Microbiology Society and SfAM offer training on topics related to your area of specialism.

Larger organisations, particularly those involved in research, may provide training and development opportunities for their staff. This may involve undertaking further qualifications such as a Masters degree or a PhD if you don't already have one.

If you're working as a clinical scientist in microbiology, you may train to become a consultant clinical scientist via the NHS Higher Specialist Scientific Training (HSST) programme. This bespoke five-year, workplace-based training programme includes study at doctoral level at a standard similar to medical speciality training and leads to the award of Certificate of Completion of Higher Specialist Scientist Training (CCHSST) issued by the NSHCS.

Career prospects

There are generally good opportunities for career progression. In the NHS, it's possible to move from practitioner, to specialist, to team manager and then consultant. At more senior levels, you'll be involved in staff management with more responsibility for the work of the laboratory.

In some fields, you may need to be geographically mobile in order to progress. Specialisation in your degree course or in your choice of first job may affect your future career options.

(Video) Applying For Quality Control Microbiologist ?? You Must Know All These !!!

Research in specialist areas such as bacteriology, virology, mycology and parasitology is possible, working with clinical colleagues or microbiologists working in industry.

Networking at all levels is part of successful career development and will help increase your career prospects. It's important to maintain a professional profile by presenting research at meetings, undertaking work exchanges abroad and applying for research grants.

Experienced microbiologists may progress into other fields of work that benefit from their specialist knowledge, such as pharmaceutical sales and marketing, patent work, teaching, scientific publishing or the legal profession.

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FAQs

Are microbiologists in demand in UK? ›

There are about 550 bioscience companies in the UK employing more than 40,000 people, many of whom are microbiologists. Clusters of bioscience companies are found in Oxford, Cambridge, London, Edinburgh and Nottingham. The demand for microbiologists is increasing.

Is there a demand for microbiologists? ›

Job Outlook: Employment of microbiologists is projected to grow 9 percent over the next ten years, faster than the average for all occupations. Related Careers: Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of microbiologists with similar occupations.

Is there a demand for microbiologists in the future? ›

Job Outlook

Employment of microbiologists is projected to grow 9 percent from 2021 to 2031, faster than the average for all occupations. About 2,000 openings for microbiologists are projected each year, on average, over the decade.

What are the job prospects for microbiology? ›

Career Opportunities for Microbiology Majors
  • Research laboratory technician.
  • Quality control analyst.
  • Clinical microbiologist or immunologist*
  • Food or dairy microbiologist.
  • Environmental microbiologist.
  • Recombinant DNA technologist.
  • Fermentation technologist.
  • Research scientist.

What is a microbiologist salary UK? ›

£78,307. The average salary for a microbiologist is £78,307 per year in United Kingdom. 466 salaries reported, updated at 20 October 2022.

Which country is best for microbiology jobs? ›

Best countries to study microbiology
  • Microbiology in USA.
  • Microbiology in New Zealand.
  • Microbiology in UK.
  • Microbiology in Canada.
  • Microbiology in Ireland.
  • Microbiology in Lebanon.
  • Microbiology in Finland.
  • Microbiology in Grenada.

Which field has highest salary in microbiology? ›

10 Highest Paying Microbiology Jobs to Consider
  • #6. Microbiology Research Assistant.
  • #5. Quality Control Microbiologist.
  • #4. Biological and Medical Scientists.
  • #3. Medical Laboratory Scientists.
  • #2. Bacteriologist.
  • #1. Microbiology Research Scientist.
  • Conclusion.
  • Similar articles.
2 Oct 2022

Are microbiologists highly paid? ›

can expect the most salary in California, where they receive an average job salary of just about $116,630.

Which field of microbiology is best? ›

A medical biotechnologist could produce medicines using techniques such as cell culture.
  • Clinical Laboratory Scientists. ...
  • Food Scientists and Technologists. ...
  • Immunologists. ...
  • Parasitologists. ...
  • Pharmaceutical Scientists and Technologists. ...
  • Sales. ...
  • Science Writers. ...
  • Teachers and Professors.
1 Sept 2016

Is microbiologist a good career? ›

Yes, microbiology is a good career.

Microbiologists typically work in laboratories, offices, and industrial settings, where they conduct experiments and analyze the results. Microbiologists who work with dangerous organisms must follow strict safety procedures to avoid contamination.

Is a degree in microbiology worth it? ›

Microbiology is an excellent major for undergraduate students who want a good general education with emphasis on an important and interesting branch of biology. Microbiology is also an excellent preparatory major for students interested in medical, dental and other health professional training.

What are the 8 fields of microbiology? ›

Pure microbiology
  • Bacteriology: the study of bacteria.
  • Mycology: the study of fungi.
  • Protozoology: the study of protozoa.
  • Phycology/algology: the study of algae.
  • Parasitology: the study of parasites.
  • Immunology: the study of the immune system.
  • Virology: the study of viruses.
  • Nematology: the study of nematodes.

Where can a microbiologist work in UK? ›

Typical employers include:
  • healthcare organisations such as the NHS and private hospitals.
  • public health organisations such as Public Health England.
  • environmental organisations.
  • industry - food and drink, petroleum, pharmaceuticals, toiletries, water and biotechnology companies.
  • forensic science laboratories.

Is microbiology better than nursing? ›

Both can give a good career satisfaction and it all depends on one's inclination. If you like taking care of people, nursing is the choice, but if you prefer to work in the lab, then it's microbiology.

How long does it take to become a microbiologist UK? ›

How long will it take? After your CMT or ACCS, training to be a consultant medical microbiologist takes four years if you're training full-time. You'll spend two years in Combined Infection Training, and two years of higher specialty training in medical microbiology.

Can a microbiologist work in a hospital? ›

Microbiologists are essential in helping us to treat diseases. Many work as biomedical scientists in hospitals and laboratories: testing samples of body tissue, blood and fluids to diagnose infections, monitor treatments or track disease outbreaks.

How difficult is microbiology? ›

So, is microbiology hard? Microbiology is a hard subject to study. It's very detail heavy; requiring you to remember a lot of facts about microscopic organisms, morphologies and modes of action. Without some basic knowledge of biology and chemistry, or the ability to memorize things easily, it's likely you'll struggle.

What do microbiologists do in the UK? ›

Medical microbiologists support and oversee the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of illness caused by microorganisms (viruses, fungi and parasites). They identify the best treatment for particular infectious diseases and monitor patients following treatment.

Which country pays highest salary to microbiologist? ›

In the end, the country that pays its scientists the most is Switzerland.

Are microbiologists happy? ›

The majority of microbiologists find their personalities quite well suited to their work, with relatively few having complaints about their fit.

Which is better microbiology or medical microbiology? ›

Answer. General microbiology places more emphasis on study of micro-organisms, while medical microbiology emphasizes more on prevention and treatment of diseases caused by these micro-organisms. Both are interesting fields with good job prospects and plenty of scope for research.

What is the lowest salary of a microbiologist? ›

The average microbiologist salary in India is ₹ 368,750 per year or ₹ 189 per hour. Entry-level positions start at ₹ 300,000 per year, while most experienced workers make up to ₹ 1,050,000 per year.

What is the salary of MSc microbiologist? ›

Microbiologist salary in India ranges between ₹ 1.0 Lakhs to ₹ 5.0 Lakhs with an average annual salary of ₹ 2.5 Lakhs.

Is MSc microbiology a good career? ›

MSc Microbiology holders can build a great career in this field. Scientific writers– They are microbiology graduates who have a flair for writing for newspapers, magazines, and scientific journals. They work with media companies, as well as for government institutions. Some also work as freelancers.

What is the monthly income of a microbiologist? ›

How much does a Microbiologist make? The national average salary for a Microbiologist is ₹22,976 in India.

Can a microbiologist become a doctor? ›

If you have an undergraduate degree in medical microbiology you should be qualified for entry to a course leading to the M. D. However, you will need to score well on the MCAT. You may also be required to take some additional science classes, depending on what your degree included.

How much is the starting salary of a microbiologist? ›

Average €30,683 per year.

What are the 2 main branches of microbiology? ›

Microbiology can be divided into two branches: pure and applied. The former is the most fundamental branch, in which organisms themselves are examined in-depth. In applied microbiology, the organisms themselves are not studied but are applied to a certain process.

Is microbiology better than biotechnology? ›

B.Sc Biotechnology and B.Sc Microbiology both courses are good. But to be more specific B.Sc Biotechnology has more career opportunities than B.Sc Microbiology. In fact, in B.Sc Biotechnology, the topics related to Microbiology are covered.

Which is better microbiology or biochemistry? ›

Both are great careers, but Microbiology is not as broad as Biochemistry. Microbiology focuses on microbes, whether in food Science, virology, vaccines and medications. But Biochemistry also focuses and observes the microbial effects on organisms.

Is microbiology a stressful job? ›

Microbiologists tend not to find their jobs stressful, which likely contributes positively to career satisfaction.

Is it easy to get job in microbiology? ›

Job outlook for Microbiologist is positive.”

At present, the scientific, analytical and problem-solving skills developed by microbiology graduates are high in demand by employers. There are various options available to you after studying for a Microbiology degree.

Which job is best after BSC microbiology? ›

Best Career Opportunities after B.Sc. Microbiology
  • Beverage Industry.
  • Food Industry.
  • Environmental Agencies.
  • Research Organizations.
  • Private Hospitals.
  • Laboratories.
  • Universities.
  • Pharmaceutical Industries.

What three qualities do you think a microbiologist needs to be successful? ›

Key skills for microbiologists
  • Patience.
  • Attention to detail.
  • Decisiveness.
  • Independence.
  • Excellent IT skills.
  • Numerical skills.
  • Analytical skills.
  • Teamworking skills.

Which is better psychology or microbiology? ›

Phsycology was known better than microbiology but now the time has made a huge change. If you want to become a professor or doctor then you must go through phsycology as it has better scope than microbiology in these areas.

How do I become a microbiologist UK? ›

You could do a degree in a subject like microbiology, biology or biological science. Some employers may ask for a relevant postgraduate qualification and work experience. You may be able to do an integrated postgraduate master's qualification like a MBiolSci, MBiol or MSci.

What are the jobs after MSc microbiology? ›

Scope of MSc Medical Microbiology
  • Lecturer/Professor.
  • Medical Microbiologist.
  • Biomedical Research Assistant.
  • Environmental Microbiologist.
  • Quality Assurance Technologist.
  • Sales/Technical Representative.
  • Clinical and Veterinary Microbiologist.
  • Medical Technologist.

What are the 4 types of microbiology? ›

By Type of Research

Astromicrobiology: the study of the origin of life on Earth, and the search for extraterrestrial life. Evolutionary microbiology: the evolution of microorganisms. Cellular microbiology: the study of the structure and function of microbial cells. Microbial ecology.

Can a microbiologist become a pathologist? ›

The microbiology section of a pathology laboratory would be headed by a pathologist (a medical doctor specialized in pathology), possibly a pathologist with further training in microbiology. A microbiologist has at least a bachelors degree in microbiology and could work in a laboratory that analyzes human samples.

Which course is best after MSc microbiology? ›

After MSc, you can pursue career either in academics or research organization/ research laboratories. There is ample opportunities to work in research lab or research organizations as microbiologist. Minimum requirement to get job in research organization is masters, however, PhD is highly desirable.

Can I switch from microbiology to medicine? ›

If you have an undergraduate degree in medical microbiology you should be qualified for entry to a course leading to the M. D. However, you will need to score well on the MCAT. You may also be required to take some additional science classes, depending on what your degree included.

Can I cross from microbiology to nursing? ›

A B.S. in microbiology does not meet the requirement to be a nurse. Those wishing to work as a nurse may pursue a Licensed Practice Nurse (LPN). LPN is the equivalent of a 2 year AA degree.

What is the hardest part of microbiology? ›

Another thing that can be difficult to grasp is in infections – different microorganisms can sometimes cause the same disease, and one microorganism can cause different diseases depending on where it is in the body for example, so there is quite a lot to learn there.

Which is harder microbiology or physiology? ›

In my opinion, physiology is the most difficult. There are so many concepts that are intertwined with other concepts or other disciplines. Physiology requires some understanding of other disciplines of biology like biochemistry, anatomy(microscopic and gross), cell biology, genetics, molecular biology, and etc.

Is microbiology easier than biology? ›

No, it is one of the more difficult biology subspecialties simply because of the sheer volume I concepts that you have to understand, like all the differences in metabolism of the various bacteria and fungi, and the different life cycles of Protozoa. There's a lot of very complex ideas in Microbiology.

Are microbiologists in demand in UK? ›

There are about 550 bioscience companies in the UK employing more than 40,000 people, many of whom are microbiologists. Clusters of bioscience companies are found in Oxford, Cambridge, London, Edinburgh and Nottingham. The demand for microbiologists is increasing.

How do I become an NHS microbiologist? ›

you must have a 1st or 2.1 either in an undergraduate honours degree or an integrated master's degree in a pure or applied science subject relevant to the specialism for which you are applying.

What does a microbiologist do in the NHS? ›

prepare cultures of micro-organisms. use a variety of tests and procedures to identify and classify organisms to help analyse and support the response to infection. help to develop and improve tests to diagnose infectious disease, through ongoing improvement and innovation.

Where can a microbiologist work in UK? ›

Typical employers include:
  • healthcare organisations such as the NHS and private hospitals.
  • public health organisations such as Public Health England.
  • environmental organisations.
  • industry - food and drink, petroleum, pharmaceuticals, toiletries, water and biotechnology companies.
  • forensic science laboratories.

How long does it take to become a microbiologist UK? ›

How long will it take? After your CMT or ACCS, training to be a consultant medical microbiologist takes four years if you're training full-time. You'll spend two years in Combined Infection Training, and two years of higher specialty training in medical microbiology.

How do I become a microbiologist UK? ›

You could do a degree in a subject like microbiology, biology or biological science. Some employers may ask for a relevant postgraduate qualification and work experience. You may be able to do an integrated postgraduate master's qualification like a MBiolSci, MBiol or MSci.

What is the highest paying job in microbiology? ›

10 Highest Paying Microbiology Jobs to Consider
  • #6. Microbiology Research Assistant.
  • #5. Quality Control Microbiologist.
  • #4. Biological and Medical Scientists.
  • #3. Medical Laboratory Scientists.
  • #2. Bacteriologist.
  • #1. Microbiology Research Scientist.
  • Conclusion.
  • Similar articles.
2 Oct 2022

Which microbiology field is best? ›

A medical biotechnologist could produce medicines using techniques such as cell culture.
  • Clinical Laboratory Scientists. ...
  • Food Scientists and Technologists. ...
  • Immunologists. ...
  • Parasitologists. ...
  • Pharmaceutical Scientists and Technologists. ...
  • Sales. ...
  • Science Writers. ...
  • Teachers and Professors.
1 Sept 2016

Is microbiologist a good career? ›

Yes, microbiology is a good career.

Microbiologists typically work in laboratories, offices, and industrial settings, where they conduct experiments and analyze the results. Microbiologists who work with dangerous organisms must follow strict safety procedures to avoid contamination.

Which course is best after MSc microbiology? ›

After MSc, you can pursue career either in academics or research organization/ research laboratories. There is ample opportunities to work in research lab or research organizations as microbiologist. Minimum requirement to get job in research organization is masters, however, PhD is highly desirable.

Do microbiologists work in hospitals? ›

Microbiologists are essential in helping us to treat diseases. Many work as biomedical scientists in hospitals and laboratories: testing samples of body tissue, blood and fluids to diagnose infections, monitor treatments or track disease outbreaks.

How do I become an NHS microbiologist? ›

you must have a 1st or 2.1 either in an undergraduate honours degree or an integrated master's degree in a pure or applied science subject relevant to the specialism for which you are applying.

What do microbiologists do in the UK? ›

Medical microbiologists support and oversee the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of illness caused by microorganisms (viruses, fungi and parasites). They identify the best treatment for particular infectious diseases and monitor patients following treatment.

How difficult is microbiology? ›

So, is microbiology hard? Microbiology is a hard subject to study. It's very detail heavy; requiring you to remember a lot of facts about microscopic organisms, morphologies and modes of action. Without some basic knowledge of biology and chemistry, or the ability to memorize things easily, it's likely you'll struggle.

Can microbiologist treat patients? ›

Microbiologists and virologists diagnose, treat and prevent the spread of infection, making a major contribution to clinical infection management. Both roles demand excellent clinical skills as well as first-class laboratory knowledge.

Can a microbiologist become a doctor? ›

If you have an undergraduate degree in medical microbiology you should be qualified for entry to a course leading to the M. D. However, you will need to score well on the MCAT. You may also be required to take some additional science classes, depending on what your degree included.

Are microbiologists highly paid? ›

can expect the most salary in California, where they receive an average job salary of just about $116,630.

What is the salary of MSc microbiologist? ›

Microbiologist salary in India ranges between ₹ 1.0 Lakhs to ₹ 5.0 Lakhs with an average annual salary of ₹ 2.5 Lakhs.

Is microbiology better than nursing? ›

Both can give a good career satisfaction and it all depends on one's inclination. If you like taking care of people, nursing is the choice, but if you prefer to work in the lab, then it's microbiology.

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